Tuesday, 4 May 2010

Slowly the garden is taking shape......

I seem to have found an answer to the rabbit problem. A few weeks ago I noticed the plants surrounded by red campion had not been touched.
This pretty ancient meadow plant does well here. Over the next few weeks I shall increase my stock.

Our native sweet woodruff is massed in a bed......
it gives off the most wonderful aroma.
Mourning widow is one of my favourite native plants. It self-seeds gently, coming up between shrubs and among other flowers.
The flowers are deep maroon, almost black.
White nettle is often considered a weed, but not in this garden. It is very attractive to insects.....I love the gaping mouth and the little platform on which the insects can alight.
The bee fly is back. Here you can see quite clearly it's long proboscis for sucking nectar from deep flowers.
The orange tip clings to Dicentra......it is a windy day.
Garlic mustard grows in the copse. It is the larval food of this pretty butterfly.
The floor of the woodland walk is greening up.
Wildflowers will soon be in bloom.
The garden is very slowly taking shape....there is still much to do. I have planted more natives in this area.

Mr P made the obelisks for me last year. The two at the front will be covered in native hops. The two at the back will each have clematis and english honeysuckle climbing them.
This bed has box hedging planted at the front. I have put so many plants in this bed that I have forgotten just what. I do know that alliums, coneflower, persicaria, lupins....there are also three obelisks in the bed, which will have clematis climbing them. As they fade white sweet peas will take over.

This area still needs some work....there are several conifers that have been ringed and need to be removed.

I don't think I have ever posted the front garden. This is where Nella goes if there are vulnerable creatures in the back garden. I would not like her to hurt the hedgehogs, young fledglings etc......

There is a new bed around the three conifers in the centre of the photograph. This small area contains......blue lupins, bearded iris, lady's mantle, and wildflowers.

Just look at plantus giganticus......it is taking over.....ugh.

Look you can even see it from the other side of the pond. I have planted a silver birch each side. They will give dappled shade. I shall net the water feature in the autumn to stop the leaves going into the water.

And finally the copse....slowly the trees are leafing up. Although the beech trees are still wearing their winter coat.

This neglected area is a wonderful habitat for wildlife.

Apart from the paths, I never cut the grass or remove weeds. It is left for the birds bees and butterflies. Most of the insects shown on safari are found in this area.

Well that is how the garden looks at this time. It is a long job and I must confess it has worn me out at times. I will not be around for safari next Sunday as Mr P is taking me away for a three day break.

I will visit your lovely blogs during the week......



33 comments:

Antique ART Garden said...

Looks great , I love the obelisks...thinking of how to use some in my yard, thanks for the post ! Gina

Patsi 'Garden Endeavors' said...

Wow !! What a yard !
So nice to see your gardens coming to life.
I'm starting to learn more about gardening from a master gardener...like what is native here. So much to learn. Still doing damage control from the snow and rain storms. Hope we both have a great year.

Steve Willson said...

I enjoy all of your posts, but I especially liked todays grand tour. Everything looks beautiful. Thank you for taking the time to do these posts.

Roses and Lilacs said...

I wonder if you have discovered a miracle deterrent for rabbits:) Maybe. The mourning window is very pretty, don't think I've ever seen it before.

Your front garden is very lovely. I like the obelisks. I made a very small one for my sweet peas but would like a large ones for clematis.
Marnie

Cheryl said...

Hi Gina. Tku. The obelisks are made of rusty metal and I personally think they fit in much better with my style of gardening.
They are large structures, although they do not look big in the photograph.

Hope you manage to find some way to use them, they are fun.

Cheryl said...

Hi Patsi, the garden is indeed coming to life. Rabbits and winter damage have certainly taken their toll but I feel at last I am making progress.

Enjoy your master gardening class, sounds fun.




I am learning to be more relaxed about this space......

Cheryl said...

Thank you Steve your comment is very much appreciated.

Cheryl said...

Hi Marnie....I must say this seems a little too good to be true but it does seem to work. Where the red campion is planted, there is no damage. In other areas where there is no red campion the same plants have been eaten or nibbled. I live in hope.

What did you make your obelisk from...willow?

marigold jam said...

Thank you for the tour - what a lovely garden you have there. Love it all! Enjoy your break and we look forward to hearing from your beautiful garden again soon.

JAne

Cheryl said...

Thank you Jane....I am sure it is not everyone's cup of tea but I love this space and all that comes visit.

Thank you re trip...believe me, it is very much needed.

Liz said...

Hi Cheryl,

Looking very pretty, would you mind terribly if I stole your garden???

No? Oh that's great, I didn't think you would! :D

Plenty going on, and it won't be long before everything is in flower, winter and spring will be a distant memory...

I've forced myself this evening to get some of the plants in pots planted... I'm becoming increasinly stressed and annoyed by the sheer volume of pots and plants waiting to get in the ground. Feel slightly better for it, but think I'll take Monday off to get the job finished.

ShySongbird said...

Oh Cheryl, it is wonderful, it really is and how very hard you have worked to make it that way. It looks just like my dream garden would! I love what you call the 'neglected' area, what a haven for wildlife.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if the Red Campion is the answer to your problems? I do hope it is...do keep us informed.

I love all the photos, it does seem to be a good year for Orange Tips.

This visit has been sheer joy Cheryl, thank you.

P.S. I remember you said you had trouble posting a comment on my blog recently. Have you had any other problems with Blogger or Google lately, I seem to have had trouble loading pages for the last week or so, on and off.

Cheryl said...

Hi Liz.....I might just tell you there have been times when I would have cheerfully given it to someone else....Distant memory now of course.

I know what you are saying about planting out. I have around three hundred plants in the greenhouse all waiting to go into the garden. It is about the only place that isn't cold at the moment. It is nice working there, very snug and warm.

Hope you get everything done.

Cheryl said...

Hi Jan.....the copse is very neglected but I intended it to be that way. I wanted wildlife to be able to go somewhere, in the garden, where it could find shelter and sanctuary....no disturbance.

Thank you for your kind and generous comment....it does mean a lot.
I have had numerous problems with blogger ....on and off. It has been very frustrating.....

beckie said...

Dear Cheryl, just home from work and sitting done to eat a bite before I go work some in the gardens. What a treat to see your gardens! I love the copse-such a natural place for your wildlife. Even the rabbits. :) Good news about the campion, wouldn't it be wonderful not to find damage in the spring??

I live the obelisks. What a great idea to conbine clematis and sweet peas.

What is that plant? Has anybody come up with a name? Certainly is huge, but very interesting. Hope you have a great time on your get away. You have earned a break. :0

Amy said...

Your garden is awesome Cheryl! Love the obelisks that Mr. P built. Even though your garden has that natural style I love so much, I do know how much work is entailed though I don't think we have as large a space as you.

Is that red campion the gray foliage that reseeds mightily? I've always called is "rose" campion; it's probably the same. Wish it would deter the dreaded voles as well as the rabbits!

Racn4acure said...

What a gift you have for gardening, Cheryl. I love the deep purple flowers (purple is Team in Training's color). The insect photos are so interesting, and the landscapes are great. I would love to take my granddaughter on a tour of your garden. :) If you are not afraid of snakes, maybe you would like the photos I posted Sunday on my hiking blog: http://o2bhiking.blogspot.com/

Have a great 3 day get-away. Art

Cheryl said...

HI Beckie....the copse is wonderful for wildlife.....nature does not like tidy. So it works.

The obelisks are great structures....it gives me height in my very flat garden.

Several people have suggested comfrey.....it is looking that they may be right.
I have grown comfrey all my gardening life and have never seen one this size. I await with anticipation.

Have fun in your garden....

Cheryl said...

Thank you Amy, you are most kind.

Red campion does spread around a bit. It is a native so very welcome here, if it deters rabbits then that is an extra bonus. Bees and butterflies love it, so if planted extensivel it will draw more into the garden.

It is very hard work at times expecially as I garden alone. Not that I mind......I have always loved the outdoors and pysical activities, so gardening is just perfect for me.

Cheryl said...

Hi Art.....not frightened of snakes.....I love them.
My daughter is terrified of them......she extends that fear to worms.....bless her

Aluajala said...

Cheryl, you have the most beautiful garden ever!
I wonder what is is about red campion that rabbits don't like? It's smell maybe?
Thanks for showing your Mourning widow - I've never seen such flower before - it looks awesome!
Have a great time gardening and relaxating too!

Rose said...

It's always such a delight to take a tour of your garden, Cheryl. I'm always amazed at how much you have done here. The natives are so interesting, especially those that I'm not familiar with. I do hope the red campion continues to keep the rabbits away--you may have found the answer to many gardeners' prayers!

We do have garlic mustard here, too, but I pull it whenever I see it. It's considered a noxious plant here because it tends to take over a woodland area and stifle other plants.

Mr. P's obelisks are lovely!

Lisa at Greenbow said...

What a wonderful walk about your garden Cheryl. Everything looks so lush. Don't you just love spring?.

Terrie B x said...

`Stunningly beautiful` as always so pleasing on the eyes!!!TFS
Have a fabulous week...Hope your all well:)xxx

A wildlife gardener said...

Of all the blogs I visit, dear Cheryl, yours feeds my heart and soul the most... :)

On this visit I have enjoyed seeing Orange-tip and Peacock butterflies; a lovely variety of hellebore; a wonderful fairy poem with Poppi as the Queen; a heart-felt photo of the happy childhood home you grew up in; an amazing array of bugs and bees and insects; hidden delights dotted around the garden and wonderful photography :)

Thanks for the happy times I spend here... :)

Cheryl said...

Hi Aluajala......after some research I have found out that the leaves are rather bitter. That must be why rabbits find the plant distasteful. It appears to be working rather well at the moment....long may it continue.

Cheryl said...

Hi Rose....
Thank you so much.

Garlic mustard does spread here but not to any worrying degree. I keep it from the garden but let it play in the copse. Hopefully the orange tips will use it.....

Cheryl said...

Dear Wildlife Gardener....thank you so much for your kind and generous comment.

I am so pleased that you enjoy my blog.......

Wendy said...

I am happy to see your garden taking shape. Springtime is such a treat as we watch the earth come to life and new plants pop up.

Thank you for the walk - I always find comfort here.

Brenda Kay Ledford said...

Cheryl,
Your garden looks great. Your flowers are so lovely. Glad you found the solution for the rabbits. They can really destroy a garden. We have a little rabbit that's visiting our garden. I need to find something to get rid of it or they little fellow will eat our vegetables. Your garden is splendid.

Naturegirl said...

Cheryl your garden certainly has filled up!So much to enjoy and view!I find Spring such an exciting season filled with so much positive energy sights and sounds!
Hummm..a problem solved with those vetetarian rabbits!
Wishing you a wonderful Mother's Day!

Naturegirl said...

Ooops! I meant to say vegetarian!

Statch said...

Your blog is so lovely, and you take amazing pictures! I love reading about the native plants, and getting ideas from you, though of course we have very different native plants here in South Carolina.