Tuesday, 5 January 2010

Roses and romance......

My favourite gardening magazine is 'The English Garden'. It speaks of everything I love. During the last year it has inspired me to think differently about my garden. I am by nature a romantic, I intend to carry that forward into the space that surrounds me. I have the perfect soil for roses. Sadly I have never been able to keep them....the reason....rabbits. They seem to have a taste for them.

BUT I will not be defeated. Today I ordered two ramblers.
Rambling Rector......large clusters of scented semi-double, creamy white blooms from July thru September, followed by small hips. A vigorous rambler ideal for covering an unsightly structure. Excellent for shady areas. I intend to plant this at the back of the garden. Hopefully, in time, it will cover some of the awful fence the railway company put there.
Francis E Lester. This beautiful rose bears large trusses of single white blooms with subtle pink edging. With it's strong fragrance it is a welcome sign of spring. Long flexible canes can easily be trained over arches etc. I plan to put this rose along the fence in front of the copse.
I am going to make/buy a willow structure to put around the roses to try and deter the rabbits. Then I shall keep my fingers crossed.
I am also planning a new border. The planting will be simple but beautiful. I intend to fill it with Queen Anne's Lace, Valerian and Angelica. Dotted amongst these lovely white blooms will be purple loosestrife.
The borders around the pond will be extended and will be full of native meadow flowers and grasses.


I am going out tomorrow to see a local plantsman to order some of the above. I must say I am eager. I realise I have much more to give this space and the prospect of spring is just so exciting.


I always value your comments and ideas. As I take this journey, your imput would be so gratefully received. Any suggestions are welcome........

28 comments:

Monica the Garden Faerie said...

I used to subscribe to The English Garden and even though I'm not at all romantic (pragmatist, me), I did love it so! I'm going to be growing my first rose this year!!! Now is definitely the time to dream of ideas in the garden...

Tara Dillard said...

Just discovered your site & love it. It's already tucked into my blogroll.

I gardened initially for aesthetics & discovered wildlife. Can't imagine not having wildlife with every window view, all day, everyday, enriching my life.

It was quite narrow to have gardened for aesthetics alone.

Your pics are incredible.

Romance? Blogged it yesterday. It's what's missing from the movie, It's Complicated vegetable
garden.

Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

Liz said...

I love the roses you've chosen Cheryl, although getting out the house tomorrow may be difficult as the snow is heading your way!

Here, have some of ours, we've had a serious amount, mental. Don't think I've ever seen it so deep.

I have plenty of willow here for you to have... I actually need to copice some of the trees for next year, shame you're so far ;)

I think a nice honeysuckle amongst the roses may be good, say a winter one or late flowering dutch honeysuckle to add fragrance and interest when the roses have finished.
Knowing me I'd just pile in the climbers... :P

ShySongbird said...

The roses look and sound wonderful Cheryl! as do all your plans, it sounds heavenly :)

Referring to your last post, I had never even thought of cutting off the old leaves on the Hellebores, I may try that. Also I am very envious of your having a Woodpecker in the garden, I would love to see one in mine.

Cheryl said...

Hi Monica.....why did you stop subscribing??
What rose will you be planting??

Time for day dreaming......most definately.....

Cheryl said...

Hi Tara...tku for dropping by and leaving a comment. Wildlife is an integral part of my garden.....I could not live without it....it frustrates me at times, but I have learnt acceptance over the years. One of the benefits of walking to older age. Will be visit your blog later.....

Cheryl said...

Hi Liz....firstly would love your willow....shame we don't live closer......never mind.

Honeysuckle, lovely........I shall plant a couple of plants alongside the roses.......tku.

Snow, please don't....I really don't want it....blowing hard and sending it back to you....lol

Cheryl said...

Hi Jan....Due to the old oak trees we get many Grt Sptd Woodies. I even had one ground feeding today...I shall post on Sunday....

A green woodpecker visits in summer to feed on ants...a particular favourite of mine.

I saw the heron in the garden today. I am very worried about him. All the ponds are frozen...I only hope he will find fish in the rivers that are close to us. What else would they eat when fish are not available?? Do you know??

Amy said...

Cheryl, I think hearty ramblers are a wise choice. When my husband and I were in the retail nursery business, it was my job to order the roses and then take care of them until they sold - and I have the scars to prove it! Now that I've had my fill of hybrid teas (even though they are beautiful), I much prefer the old fashioned ramblers. Less pruning, less maintenance and predictable blooms.

The Knock Out rose has rec'd much press - it's definitely a landscape rose (comes in different colors) and is remarkably disease resistant.

Your border idea sounds awesome!

Brenda Kay Ledford said...

I'm not familiar with The English Garden, but it sounds like a great magazine. I sure wish you lots of luck with your garden and your roses. I love roses and hope you flowers do wonderfully.

Cheryl said...

Thank you Amy for such an interesting and informative comment. It must have been wonderful to run a nursery....my idea of heaven.

I shall look up Knock out rose....tku for putting it forward.

Watch this space.....

Cheryl said...

Thank you Barbara, you are so very kind......

Q said...

Dear Cheryl,
Your roses will be fantastic! I love the old fashion ones that ramble and fill the air with heavenly scent. Perfect for rose water too for your refreshment.
Do hope yopu are warm! I also have the deep snow and cold air....
Looking forward to seeing Woodpeckers. They are amazing birds.
Sherry

Cindee said...

Hi Cheryl,
I have been subscribing to English Garden and Gardens Illustrated for years. Other mags come and go, but these 2 are must-haves.
Won't the rabbits chew through the willow to get to your roses?
Cindee

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I love roses. I don't have very good luck with them but I know you will have good luck. I can't wait to see all about your projects. You sound so enthusiastic. I am just too cold to think about planting. Maybe I need to go purchase one of these magazines. I have seen The English Garden at the bookstore. I will think of you ever time I see it now.

Cheryl said...

Dear Sherry.....I have missed roses in my garden.....there is nothing like the perfume of a rose.
I do hope that I will be able to protect them from rabbit damage. I love rose water....my grandmother would always have some to hand. Sweet memories.

Stay warm
Stay strong

Cheryl said...

Hi Cindee.....i am hoping the willow will be fine. The rabbits have not touched other willow structures......

tku for dropping by......

Cheryl said...

Hi Lisa.... tku....I do hope the roses will be ok. I know I am taking a huge risk but this will be my last chance with them. If the rabbits win again, I will give up.

Nice to know someone thinks of me.......

Roses and Lilacs said...

There is nothing more romantic than roses. I used to grow them until the invasion of the Japanese Beetle.

If I had rabbit problems, I would cage the lower foot of cane in hardware cloth (it is a very small square wire mesh). After the rose leafs out and smaller plants grow up, the wire would not be noticeable.
Marnie

Cheryl said...

Thank you Marnie....I shall do that as double protection. With both methods put into place that will work nicely......

Rose said...

Cheryl, I am definitely a romantic at heart, too! I love roses, but I don't grow anything other than my Knockouts because I always think of them as needing so much attention. But I'm going to try a few new ones, too, as soon as I decide on a space for them. Isn't it funny that rabbits aren't deterred by the thorns on the roses? I think a border of these roses at the back of your garden would be beautiful--it brings up a image of just what I think an English cottage garden should look like.

Dee/reddirtramblings said...

My garden is in the English style, but I use a lot of plants which like our Oklahoma heat. I wonder if chicken wire, painted an unobtrusive green would protect your young roses so they had time to grow before the rabbits chewed on them. I use it here over tulips and other plants. I didn't know the second rose, but I grow 90 roses, so if I can help, please let me know. 'Mermaid' is another large rambler, and 'New Dawn' is an excellent climber.

I have purple loosestrife in my garden because it's always been here, but I've heard it is invasive in some places. Also, Bishop's Weed blooms when Queen's Ann's Lace stops.~~Dee

Dan said...

Hi Cheryl
I had a Rambling Rector in my previous garden, and also want one in my new one, where I have a large area of fencing (covered in ivy) where it needs a tough rose to hold its own. It was big and beautiful, and didn't need too much care and attention.
I think your ideas, and the way you describe them, are fantastic!
Let me know how you get on with the angelica. I'd never grown it before, but it worked really well for me over the past couple of years, and I hope it will continue to thrive now that it has its feet in a new home at the cottage.

Liz said...

Hi Cheryl,

Our willow is the yellow-branched type, I forget which salix exactly, but I do fancy also getting the orange/red one to contrast with the yellow :)

I should probably use the branches myself to make a screen, I had begun planting any cut branches against the fence to help add more privacy but also in case they set root, and guess what?! One actually did, they’re such amazing trees, they root so easily.

A pink honeysuckle will no doubt contrast wonderfully with the pinky white roses, mmm you’re tempting me now!

I hope the snow isn’t causing too many problems for you at the moment, no doubt schools are closed?

Racn4acure said...

Those whascally wabbits! Good luck with your new projects. I've enjoyed the photos on your posts as always. Happy New Year. Art

Moonstone Gardens said...

Hi Cheryl,
Here's a tip we use at the Village Green for our roses and it works wonderfully.
Plant annual alyssum under your roses (hopefully the rabbits won't eat it). The alyssum attracts beneficial insects that eat aphids. The aphids are not only harmful for sucking sap, but they also apread blackspot. The alyssum also keeps fungus spores from splashing up on the rose from the soil when you water.
We have many roses in our Fragrance Garden and we never have to use any chemicals on them.
Cindee

Cheryl said...

Hi Cindee....I am an organic gardener, so this tip, for me, is perfect.....

I shall grow some alyssum (not sure if rabbits like it)....and see what happens. I like the thought of the roses underplanted with these pretty white flowers.

You are very kind, tku.....

Tina said...

Hope you are lucky with your roses. They’ll be beautiful. We don`t have a large garden but roses must be there! We even got a rambler to grow up our little garden shed. I do so much love my roses!